“Maple and Pine”

“Maple and Pine”

-Maple and Pine-

Let sunlight shine upon you bright,
May brilliant days give you respite.

Listen to the rustling leaves,
Among the Pine and Maple trees.

Bright and green they glisten so,
How we wish they dare not go.

Summer days now halfway through,
With fond memories they stay with you.

Keep this scene within your mind,
When sun filled days are left behind.

~Rachel Cohen~

“Darker Days”

In 1885, Michigan opened its third mental institution which was in Traverse City. The institution contained twelve cottages, as well as two infirmaries. The original central administrative building was a hallmark of Victorian-Italiante architecture, but it was sadly demolished in 1963, after it was deemed it a fire hazard.
The twelve smaller cottages, which date from 1885 to 1903, still stand, and have been renovated for different purposes.
Dr. Munson, who headed the Hospital at the time believed in the idea that we should use the “beauty as therapy” method for the mentally ill, so the grounds were covered with trees and flowers. I didn’t get the chance to get images of the grounds, but they are still lovely, with huge trees, gardens, and large open green spaces!

The asylum was completely self-sufficient. The patients worked making furniture, canning fruit, and farming, all to earn funds for the hospital. The hospital produced its own steam to heat and electrify the buildings.

Over time, the space was used to treat other diseases, such as tuberculosis, polio, and, in the mid-late 1980s, as a drug rehabilitation center. But in 1989, the state finally closed the doors of the hospital.

In a twist of fate, the property was purchased by a group of developers, who then renovated the deteriorating buildings to develop it for commercial and residential use. The project was finished in 2010. It now houses hotels, apartments, boutiques, quaint shoppes, an urban winery, coffee roaster, a bakery and more.

While today very different, the Village at Grand Traverse Commons still evokes a time when the mentally ill lived here in a harmony which was rarely found even in the sane world. Quite a beautiful location and series of buildings!

My image here was taken as the sun was beginning to set behind this main building. The clouds were amassing, and the combination of architecture and sky was beautiful.

I decided to take make this image on a slant as to gain more of the sky, get in some of the more important aspects of the building, and to keep unwanted shoppers and visitors out of the frame.

I also processed this in monochrome which really gave it the feel of “Darker Days”. That image can be seen on 500px for those of you who missed it.

So as you see. Today I decided to get away from cars, which I’ve done quite a lot of lately, and give you a bit of architecture and sky drama, as well as a little history.

Enjoy!

Historical Architecture
Historical Architecture

“Rockin the Terraplane”

This post is a really simple one. I have an image of a really cool Terraplane. Don’t ask me the year, for I haven’t a clue! Well maybe a 1935. Feel free to let me know! 🙂

This baby is gorgeous Ruby Red!! I processed it first in color, then again in B&W using Nik Silver Efex Pro.
I tend towards the color version, but I do like the way it processed in the monochrome also!

Your mission should you chose to accept is to………………let me know which image you prefer and why. 🙂

“Ruby Red Terraplane”

-Ruby Red Terraplane-

“Ruby Red Terraplane” mono

-Ruby Red Terraplane- mono

“1960”

Bringing us back once again to the 2013 Motor Muster in Dearborn Michigan!

I must say that the Motor Muster is a real must( no pun intended ) for car lovers, and history buffs alike. There’s so much to be found across the many acres that envelope this annual car show.

In my last post I brought you some memorabilia from the 1950’s including the Brownie Hawkeye camera. In this post we have a full front and left side view of the beautiful 1960 Buick Le Sabre in blue with assorted things from around that time period laid out neatly on a blanket in front of the car.

Unlike my last post which focused mainly on the camera and magazine with very little of the 1955 Jaguar associated with it. This image brings you the full scene. Luckily for me, this little ensemble also included a camera from around the same time period a Kodak Duaflex III, which actually went out of production in 1960.

What I love so much about this is the feeling of nostalgia. Memories that take me back to a different time and place. That’s something that is a wonderful feeling. I feel that preserving and restoring vintage or classic cars, buildings, homes, structures, signs, cameras, etc. is an important part of sharing the past with future generations to come.

Of course preserving the land, forests, oceans, lakes, and……well you get the idea. Taking care of the whole world is another even more important trust on mankind, and therefore will have to remain a topic for another post, or better yet many posts!!

I hope you enjoy today’s image. Let me know if you’ve ever had the opportunity to drive or own a 1960 Buick Le Sabre, or if you have a Duaflex I, II, III, or even a IV camera in your vintage camera collection, maybe you even have photos that were taken with it! I’d love to see those! 🙂

I’ll be posting more images from the Motor Muster in future posts. But for now:

Have a great week everyone!!

  1960 Buick Le Sabre
1960 Buick Le Sabre

“Brownie Hawkeye”

Well, here’s the post I promised you. While at the 2013 Motor Muster, I came across this beautiful 1955 Jaguar. The car itself was wonderful and in addition to that, the owners had also put a copy of Life magazine a 1956 issue, and a beautiful Brownie Hawkeye Camera!! Yay!!

The whole setup had a great vintage feel to it!! I took many shots of the car itself, but in reality what interested me more this time was the Brownie! 🙂

I got a bit of info together about this little wonder of a camera, and I thought I’d share it with you!

The Brownie Hawkeye cameras have a molded bakelite body and use a brilliant viewfinder. This is the Brownie Hawkeye non-synchronized non-flash model featured in this image.
This same camera was also manufactured in France as a Brownie Flash Camera. These cameras were no longer produced after 1961.

The Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model Camera is recognized as one of the most popular Brownie cameras made. It is easy to use and is still extremely popular with film photographers because it’s cheap to buy!
The big square negatives it produces are large enough for contact prints or can be enlarged for spectacular sharp prints. The bulb setting for time exposures rounds off this great camera.
This beautiful camera was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey, who also designed many other popular Kodak cameras.

I would bet that quite a few of you out there have a Brownie. Chime in if you’d like to add any personal experiences that you have had with it!!

I hope you enjoy this image today. I really love going back in time. It’s so nice when people take the time to get objects together that come from relatively the same time period. It really makes the whole experience just that much more memorable and fun!!

-Brownie Hawkeye-