“Cosmic Marbles”

I have had the opportunity to do a little more experimenting with some oil and water abstract photography this past week, courtesy of the horrendously cold weather we’ve been having. LOL 😉

I have also been doing a lot of macro flower work, but that is another post entirely.

I went in search of better glass for my oil and water work, but didn’t find it. I’m still searching for the perfect glass with no imperfections! I tried more than one type of setup for this work, but in the end these two images came from the same type of setup, but turned out very differently.

I wish I had photos of how I worked on these but alas, I don’t. What I can tell you is that it is much better to have 2 coffee tables or two stools to be able to put your glass dish on, and better yet, a perfect glass topped coffee table! 🙂

In both of these images I took two 12 packs of Pepsi, stood them up straight, then I cut a long piece of wrapping paper with colorful print on it, and slid it between the boxes making sure to have lots extra in length.

Next, I took a glass dish and very carefully put the edges of the dish on the ends of the tops of the boxes. Making sure that is was straight, I then poured in a small amount of water, and added tiny drops of oil. I ended up moving the oil around a bit as the bubbles moved and changed positions.

I set up my tripod, a cropped sensor camera with a 100mm macro lens attached, and a remote shutter release plugged into the side.

I fixed a small bendable lamp posed on the floor for extra lighting. I tried doing it two ways. One with the wrapping paper on top of the light, the other with the light shining on the paper.

I got quite a few shots, some at f2.8, others at f3.2, and some higher. I also pulled the wrapping paper into different positions to utilize the many colors available.

Here are two of the examples. I personally like “Moon Drops and Peaches” better than “Cosmic Marbles”, but I thought I’d share both.

I plan to keep having fun and experimenting with these and other macro images, especially while waiting for spring to arrive. I encourage you to do it too. You don’t have to have the perfect setup.
Just work with what you have. Take your time and enjoy! 🙂

"Cosmic Marbles"
“Cosmic Marbles”
"Moon Drops and Peaches"
“Moon Drops and Peaches”

“1960”

Bringing us back once again to the 2013 Motor Muster in Dearborn Michigan!

I must say that the Motor Muster is a real must( no pun intended ) for car lovers, and history buffs alike. There’s so much to be found across the many acres that envelope this annual car show.

In my last post I brought you some memorabilia from the 1950’s including the Brownie Hawkeye camera. In this post we have a full front and left side view of the beautiful 1960 Buick Le Sabre in blue with assorted things from around that time period laid out neatly on a blanket in front of the car.

Unlike my last post which focused mainly on the camera and magazine with very little of the 1955 Jaguar associated with it. This image brings you the full scene. Luckily for me, this little ensemble also included a camera from around the same time period a Kodak Duaflex III, which actually went out of production in 1960.

What I love so much about this is the feeling of nostalgia. Memories that take me back to a different time and place. That’s something that is a wonderful feeling. I feel that preserving and restoring vintage or classic cars, buildings, homes, structures, signs, cameras, etc. is an important part of sharing the past with future generations to come.

Of course preserving the land, forests, oceans, lakes, and……well you get the idea. Taking care of the whole world is another even more important trust on mankind, and therefore will have to remain a topic for another post, or better yet many posts!!

I hope you enjoy today’s image. Let me know if you’ve ever had the opportunity to drive or own a 1960 Buick Le Sabre, or if you have a Duaflex I, II, III, or even a IV camera in your vintage camera collection, maybe you even have photos that were taken with it! I’d love to see those! 🙂

I’ll be posting more images from the Motor Muster in future posts. But for now:

Have a great week everyone!!

  1960 Buick Le Sabre
1960 Buick Le Sabre

“Brownie Hawkeye”

Well, here’s the post I promised you. While at the 2013 Motor Muster, I came across this beautiful 1955 Jaguar. The car itself was wonderful and in addition to that, the owners had also put a copy of Life magazine a 1956 issue, and a beautiful Brownie Hawkeye Camera!! Yay!!

The whole setup had a great vintage feel to it!! I took many shots of the car itself, but in reality what interested me more this time was the Brownie! 🙂

I got a bit of info together about this little wonder of a camera, and I thought I’d share it with you!

The Brownie Hawkeye cameras have a molded bakelite body and use a brilliant viewfinder. This is the Brownie Hawkeye non-synchronized non-flash model featured in this image.
This same camera was also manufactured in France as a Brownie Flash Camera. These cameras were no longer produced after 1961.

The Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model Camera is recognized as one of the most popular Brownie cameras made. It is easy to use and is still extremely popular with film photographers because it’s cheap to buy!
The big square negatives it produces are large enough for contact prints or can be enlarged for spectacular sharp prints. The bulb setting for time exposures rounds off this great camera.
This beautiful camera was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey, who also designed many other popular Kodak cameras.

I would bet that quite a few of you out there have a Brownie. Chime in if you’d like to add any personal experiences that you have had with it!!

I hope you enjoy this image today. I really love going back in time. It’s so nice when people take the time to get objects together that come from relatively the same time period. It really makes the whole experience just that much more memorable and fun!!

-Brownie Hawkeye-